The 20 days of 20×20 Day 16 – 16th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

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The deadline for the annual Access Space 20×20 open art exhibition 2014 is 17th September. It’s free to enter and you can submit work in any medium on any subject as long as it’s 20 inches square.

You can buy a ready-made box construction “canvas” for £3.75 or you can construct your own.

There will be an opening on the evening of the 19th September 5.30 – 8pm and the show is open to the public from Saturday 20th. Access Space’s opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm. Free entry.

http://access-space.org

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The 20 days of 20×20 Day 15 – 15th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

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The deadline for the annual Access Space 20×20 open art exhibition 2014 is 17th September. It’s free to enter and you can submit work in any medium on any subject as long as it’s 20 inches square.

You can buy a ready-made box construction “canvas” for £3.75 or you can construct your own.

There will be an opening on the evening of the 19th September 5.30 – 8pm and the show is open to the public from Saturday 20th. Access Space’s opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm. Free entry.

http://access-space.org

The 20 days of 20×20 Day 14 – 14th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

Screen shot 2014-09-02 at 13.28.27

The deadline for the annual Access Space 20×20 open art exhibition 2014 is 17th September. It’s free to enter and you can submit work in any medium on any subject as long as it’s 20 inches square.

You can buy a ready-made box construction “canvas” for £3.75 or you can construct your own.

There will be an opening on the evening of the 19th September 5.30 – 8pm and the show is open to the public from Saturday 20th. Access Space’s opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm. Free entry.

http://access-space.org

The 20 days of 20×20 Day 13 – 13th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

Screen shot 2014-09-02 at 13.28.17

The deadline for the annual Access Space 20×20 open art exhibition 2014 is 17th September. It’s free to enter and you can submit work in any medium on any subject as long as it’s 20 inches square.

You can buy a ready-made box construction “canvas” for £3.75 or you can construct your own.

There will be an opening on the evening of the 19th September 5.30 – 8pm and the show is open to the public from Saturday 20th. Access Space’s opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm. Free entry.

http://access-space.org

The 20 days of 20×20 Day 12 – 12th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

Screen shot 2014-09-02 at 13.28.10

The deadline for the annual Access Space 20×20 open art exhibition 2014 is 17th September. It’s free to enter and you can submit work in any medium on any subject as long as it’s 20 inches square.

You can buy a ready-made box construction “canvas” for £3.75 or you can construct your own.

There will be an opening on the evening of the 19th September 5.30 – 8pm and the show is open to the public from Saturday 20th. Access Space’s opening hours are Tuesday to Saturday 11am – 7pm. Free entry.

http://access-space.org

The 20 days of 20×20 Day 11 – 11th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

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Here is another seminal influence of mine, “Le Mystere Picasso” (1956, director Henri-Georges Clouzot). I saw this film for the first time on the TV in the mid-1980s but it was already considered a classic. I haven’t had time to go through all the clips in this playlist, but I recommend watching the whole film if possible.

In 1956, it would have taken some significant resources to capture live of timelapse film. These days it’s almost too easy to capture everything, and therein lies a problem. I have made life difficult for myself on many occasions, not necessarily because I missed something, but because I captured far too much media and then either didn’t know what to do with it, or else just didn’t have time to deal with it all.

In the embedded clip you can see some sort of confrontation going on as the director is about to run out of film in the current magazine. I have had quite the opposite problem, and last year managed to capture great long sequences of pretty much nothing. Watching paint dry is only novel once, and having made something of it in 2012, it just wasn’t funny the second time around.

Many years later, I have all these tools at my disposal; more cameras than I can use, a digital paintbox (see previous post) and my own film production facilities. And what do I do with it?

Paint.

The 20 days of 20×20 Day 10 – 10th September 2014 @AccessSpace #20×202014

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Many thousands of my fans will not remember a 1980s BBC TV series of six programmes entitled “Painting With Light”, which featured well-known artists using the, then cutting-edge, Quantel Painbox to create artworks with what appeared to be a new medium. The artists featured were David Hockney, Richard Hamilton, Howard Hodgkin, Sir Sidney Nolan, Larry Rivers and Jennifer Bartlett, and they were all filmed using the Paintbox, assisted by artist and technician Martin Holbrook.

I can’t find much online but I scavenged most of this information from a blog post by Tiernan Morgan (the images here are embedded from his blog, copyright applies).
http://www.thebambamblog.com/2012/03/david-hockney-and-the-quantel-paintbox/

As far as it being a “new medium”, I have mixed feelings. Hockney and Hodgkin used it quite literally, as a paintbox, although the luminance of the display gave it what Hockney described as “liquid stained glass”. Hockney is one of the most inspiring artists as he is willing to try new things and move on, rather than sticking to a formula and knocking out the same old shit forever.

Nolan’s work I’ve never liked and I can’t remember Rivers or Bartlett (it’s 30 years ago), but the artist that really stood out for me was Richard Hamiltion, not only for the quality of his work but also his understanding of the tool he was using. Hamilton used a number of source images to lay out a new work called “The Subject”, which is one of three diptychs. The final work is paint on canvas but the programme demonstrated some of the potential of the then nascent technology, if only as an aid to visualisation.
http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/hamilton-the-subject-t06774

I hope the series becomes available again, it’s worth watching despite the almost universal proliferation of far superior digital tools.

The reason I am writing about this is that it was a seminal influence on my work, not necessarily the digital tool itself, but more the TV programme and how it gave some insight into artists’ working methods.

Anyway, here is a timelapse video of me “painting with light” from last year’s 20×20 sessions, after abandoning the paint pizza and wondering what to do next.

I’ll say more about this in the next post.